Posts Tagged ‘Moss Landing Marine Laboratories’

Drew Gashler Internship at stake! Please consider donating

February 21, 2014

by Ben Yair Raanan, Physical Oceanography Lab

For nearly a decade the Friends of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have generously awarded a $5,000 summer internship at MBARI to an MLML student in the name of Drew Gashler, a former MLML student and MBARI employee. Unfortunately, due to lack of funds, it may be impossible to offer this incredible opportunity to one of our students this year.

MLML physical oceanography student Diane Wyse placing the nose cone on the Tethys AUV. Photo by: Todd Walsh/MBARI 2012

MLML physical oceanography student Diane Wyse placing the nose cone on the Tethys AUV. Photo by: Todd Walsh/MBARI 2012

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Journey to the Center of the Slough

February 14, 2014

by Catarina Pien, PSRC Lab

If you’ve ever visited our lab, you’ve seen the beautiful waters surrounding us, often bobbing with a variety of marine mammals. The main body of water that surrounds Moss Landing Marine Laboratories is Elkhorn Slough, which is an estuarine embayment that drains into the Monterey Bay.

Beautiful Elkhorn Slough, photo by Jennifer Chiu

Beautiful Elkhorn Slough, photo by Jennifer Chiu

Elkhorn Slough has evolved greatly in the past few centuries. Since the dredging of Moss Landing Harbor in 1946, the slough has become directly connected and thus heavily influenced by the Monterey Bay. This connection has led the slough to change from a freshwater-influenced estuary to a predominantly saltwater-influenced and erosional body of water. A great deal of research has been done to study how these changes have influenced habitat structure and biological communities in the slough.

My own thesis research will focus on Elkhorn Slough, and how various oceanographic variables have changed and are influencing elasmobranch (shark and ray) populations in the slough. I am hoping that the class will be beneficial in showing me how to measure chemical variables, and analyze values in terms of how they influence biological communities.

Map of Elkhorn Slough, from Google Earth

Map of Elkhorn Slough, from Google Earth

Last week, our chemical oceanography class was split into five groups and deployed to various water bodies around our school to take some measurements and water samples. It had just rained earlier that week, so we were hoping there would be some visible differences in salinity and nutrient content in the regions we were sampling. Although the main channel of Elkhorn Slough is heavily influenced by the Monterey Bay, and thus oceanographically similar to the ocean, the upper reaches of the slough are often less saline (depending on the season), and more influenced by precipitation. One group went offshore to Monterey Bay, two groups went into Elkhorn Slough, one drove around to Salinas River, Carneros Creek, and other connected sloughs, and my group sampled in Moss Landing Harbor.

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We took one of our school’s whalers on a beautiful sunny morning, excited (though some of our facial expressions may not be representative) and ready to sample.

Our team!

We motored slowly through the harbor, observing sea lions sunning themselves, and being observed by harbor seals and a portly sea otter.

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Sea lions sunning themselves

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Curious harbor seals

Large male otter

Large male otter

Once at a station, we used the CTD (Conductivity Temperature Depth) to measure salinity, temperature, and pH at eight stations within our region.

CTD measures salinity, temperature, pH among other oceanographic variables

CTD measures salinity, temperature, pH among other oceanographic variables

We also recorded GPS coordinates, and collected water samples with a syringe, and filtered them into a bottle to bring back to the lab.

Marisa is inserting CTD to measure salinity, temperature, pH

Marisa is inserting CTD to measure salinity, pH and temperature

Emily recording CTD measurements

Emily recording CTD measurements

Marisa filtering seawater

Marisa filtering seawater 

Many of the changes to Elkhorn Slough have been anthropogenic, including the construction of levees, dikes, tide gates, salt ponds, and railroads. Some of these were constructed early on for agriculture and ranching, whereas others have been created to remedy erosional problems we have created.  These barriers have altered tidal flow within Elkhorn Slough, and created distinct oceanographic areas. In order to determine differences between these areas, some stations required us to leave the boat to sample adjacent areas that were separated by a barrier.

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Evan braving the train tracks, photo by Jennifer Chiu

We passed by the lab, hoped we wouldn’t embarrass ourselves in front of the whole lab, and successfully finished our collections near the tide gate leading to the Old Salinas River.

MLML!

MLML!

Combined with the rest of the teams, we now have oceanographic measurements and water samples all around Elkhorn Slough and the surrounding bodies of water. Over the course of the semester, we will learn how to measure phosphate, nitrite/ nitrate, oxygen, silicate, and alkalinity of the water samples. The measurements will tell us something about how how the stations differ from each other, how Elkhorn Slough is partitioned, and the outside influences to each station.

As marine scientists, many of us spend a substantial chunk of time in the field. While field work can be frustrating and tiring, on a beautiful day like this, encountering a multitude of wildlife and puttering slowly through the beautiful waters, it is easy to remember why we went into the field of marine science.

Whalefest: Not Just a Tale of Whales

February 3, 2014

By Melissa Nehmens, PSRC

Whalefest banner 2014

Whalefest banner 2014

On January 25th and 26th, the Monterey Fisherman’s Wharf held its 4th annual Whalefest event to celebrate the migration of grey whales. Thanks to the efforts of fellow Pacific Shark Research Center (PSRC) student, Kristin Walovich, the PSRC and Friends of Moss Landing Marine Labs, hosted a booth at the event, speaking to attendees and passersby about what Moss Landing Marine Labs is all about!

Table attractions for the PSRC included a dehydrated Mako shark head and shark fin from our museum collection, and an anatomical model of a great white that allows you to see the inside of a shark. An interactive matching game, created by PSRC student Jessica Jang, was another favorite allowing people to test their shark knowledge by matching a shark to its description and name. We also showcased a story done by Central Coast News, interviewing PSRC director, Dave Ebert, about the lab’s role in international shark research.

How well do you know your sharks? PSRC student, Vicky Vasquez, helps a girl figure it out.

How well do you know your sharks? PSRC student, Vicky Vasquez, helps a girl figure it out.

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May the Flow Be With You!

January 22, 2014

Scott GabaraBy Scott Gabara, Phycology “Seaweed” Lab

Circulating seawater systems are very important for marine laboratories as they need to keep organisms from the ocean alive and use the water to aid in conducting experiments.  We have recently had our Moss Landing Marine Laboratories offshore intake upgraded and we went on a dive to inspect its current status.  The large meshed cylinder sucks in water and supplies our lab with flowing seawater.  We routinely inspect and clean the surface of the grates and the structure. 

One of our MLML intakes rising from the sand.

One of our MLML intakes rising from the sand.

It is interesting to see what invertebrates recruit or move onto the structure.  With sand surrounding us we create a small oasis of life concentrated on the hard substrate.  One of the issues we have to deal with is that seawater contains invertebrate larvae and some species will settle on the inside the pipes and eventually constrict and clog our flow, similar to plaque buildup in an artery.  We have to force a Pigging Inspection Gauge (PIG), a tool which is usually a piece of cylindrical foam, through the inside of the pipe to clean and clear the walls.  It’s great we can get routine cleanings so our seawater system continues flowing and our lab doesn’t have a “heart attack”!

Diana Steller inspects our intake line.

Diana Steller, Dive Safety Officer, inspects our intake line.

Lights Out, Dives In

December 1, 2013

Recently the marine science diving class here at Moss Landing Marine Labs went down to Monterey’s Breakwater to conduct a sunset and night dive.  The first dive was to a rocky outcrop called the Metridium field.  The Metridium are white plumose anemones that look like fluffy cauliflowers and filter particulates out of the water.  It is a stunning sight with so many anemones.

Martin and Metridium

Martin and Metridium

The second dive was conducted by nightfall.  Every diver had a glow-stick to better locate their buddy and stay in visual contact in the dark.  Each diver has a waterproof light, it takes practice to communicate underwater let alone now using a flashlight.  We saw different species like red octopus which were out foraging and rockfish that seemed to hover almost half asleep in the water column.  It is interesting to see these changes that happen as the rocky reef changes from day to night.

Sunset Diving with Martin Guo, Paul Clerkin and Scott Miller (left to right)

Sunset Diving with Martin Guo, Paul Clerkin and Scott Miller (left to right)

Happy Halloween!

October 31, 2013

By Melissa Nehmens

This time of year offers the chance to provide a romanticized explanation of autumn on the central coast. I could explain how here at Moss Landing the weather is turning colder, the leaves are changing color, and the storm clouds bring a scented promise of the rains to come.  However, we have more important things to discuss: Halloween!

This past weekend was Moss Landing Marine Labs’ annual Halloween Party. Everyone came in costumes and as part of the tradition, each lab or group brought their pumpkin to be judged by the student body in the pumpkin carving contest. Though officially there was only one winner, I think everyone did a great job. What do you think?

assorted pumpkins

Front Desk, Biological Oceanography lab, Shop, and PSRC pumpkins

scuba pumpkin

Scuba Pumpkin

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New Recruits to Moss Landing

September 7, 2013

HFB

by Heather Fulton-Bennett, Phycology Lab

The fall semester has brought the return to classes, gorgeous weather, and most excitingly, a new crop of students to Moss Landing Marine Labs. This year we welcomed 15 new marine scientists to 8 of the labs, and their past adventures and new ideas for theses are inspiring already. Potential thesis projects range from molecular ecology of invertebrates in Indonesia to sediment movement at the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the life history strategies of deep sea sharks.

New students meet for orientation with staff and student body officers

New students meet for orientation with staff and student body officers

Check out the Meet the Students page to see how they came to Moss Landing Marine Labs, and check back as several of the new students will be writing for the Drop-In in the future!

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MLML’s small boats coordinator explains the program to the new students during a facilities tour

Big Creek a Big Success

August 26, 2013

Summer Science Diving Class 2013

Twelve days is not a lot of time to absorb everything you need to know to be a scientific diver, but we spend long days learning and coffee helps us get through.  During August we teach a two-week long intensive scientific diving course.  Students learn different rescue techniques, get exposed to boating and engines, assist with filling of our SCUBA cylinders, learn basic knot tying, and collect data about fish, algae and invertebrates.  During the second week of the class we camp and dive at the magical Big Creek Reserve in Big Sur.  The state marine reserve is some of the best diving I have done with large understory kelps that you navigate through like 6-foot tall trees out of Dr. Seuss.  The class learns important fish, algae and invertebrate species and completes a Reef Check California survey by the end of the course.  We had some great conditions and a great class, see this link for a short video of one of the dives.

Big Creek Beach Summer 2013

Tis the season for MLML Open House

March 19, 2013
The vertebrate ecology lab’s recreation of the inside of a whale. (photo by The Moss Lander).

The vertebrate ecology lab’s recreation of the inside of a whale. (photo by The Moss Lander).

Tis the season for MLML Open House

By Michelle Marraffini

Invertebrate Zoology and Molecular Ecology Lab

The spring semester is buzzing with activity from classes, field trips, and preparing for Open House.

Have you ever walked inside the belly of a whale?  Want to know how long turtles live or what seastars eat?  This year’s Open House will answer these and so many more of your ocean questions.  Be there Saturday April 20th and Sunday April 21st from 9am to 5pm.  As a FREE EVENT we offer a marine adventure puppet show, education presentations by students and faculty, live touch tanks, a sea lion show, raffle and prizes, and so much more.  There is so much to see you will need to come back both days!

Open House!

Entry Way to MLML. Dive into Open House! April 20th and 21st
Photo by: Scott Gabara

Chronicles of a Curious Beachcomber

February 21, 2013

by Angela Szesciorka, Vertebrate Ecology Lab

A few Sundays ago — Super Bowl Sunday, in fact — I took a three-hour walk along the beach at Fort Ord in Monterey, CA with Don Glasco, a systems engineer and former cartographer.

This wasn’t a leisurely pursuit, but my volunteer service to the Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network’s (SIMoN) Coastal Ocean Mammal and Bird Education and Research Surveys, also known as Beach COMBERS.

I meet Don at Fort Ord Dunes State Park in Marina around 9 a.m. After downing the last of my coffee, we head out into the foggy morning.

Don Glasco referring to the almighty bird book to identify an unknown species by its toes. Photo by Angela Szesciorka.

Don Glasco referring to the almighty bird book to identify an unknown species by its toes.

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